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Andy Milner

Reverse mentoring

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Luuk Jacobs

I like the example given in this article. I believe the essence of it is next to the reverse mentoring also to take bias out of the views of people colleagues, in this case the bias around ethnic minorities. Equally it can increase the confidence in general and speaking up or challenging ideas of older or more senior colleagues.

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