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Luuk Jacobs

growth of UK Economy

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Luuk Jacobs
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WWW.BBC.CO.UK

Warm weather boosted consumer spending, the Office for National Statistics says.

 

The heading of this article gives a very positive spin to UK Economic growth. Reading the details however show a less rosy picture with basically the month of July pulling the growth wagon and less fortunate times ahead.

 

Some articles highlight that the mounting insecurity around Brexit will start to hit the 4th quarter growth if any

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      DISCLAIMER
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