Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Andy Milner

Women seeking mentoring outside their companies

Recommended Posts

Jonathan Max

@Tarne Bevan

This is a really interesting topic, I have written a blog on this which will be published shortly. 

When considering the choices around mentoring, there are two paths to follow. Those being mentoring relationships inside and outside the organisation; these are certainly not mutually exclusive and there are significant benefits in pursuing both simultaneously.

There is a good article here (https://www.geteverwise.com/mentoring/leveraging-internal-and-external-mentors-for-optimal-growth/).

The perspective on gender is a fascinating dynamic and I would be keen to hear other views 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Become a member to read more and join the discussion

Members can read and contribute to discussions

Join us

Register now for free access.

Create your account

Sign in

Already a member? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  
  • Related Content

    • Eva Keogan
      By Eva Keogan
      Nominations revealed for the 2019 Women in Investment Awards
      WWW.INVESTMENTWEEK.CO.UK Over 1,300 nominations received Great to see a long list of nominees here!
    • Rob Carter
      By Rob Carter
      Brexit, MiFID II, GDPR, Gender Pay Gap and Diversity are the themes we consider top of mind currently which is why we’ve created the Summer 2018 AlgoMe Industry Pulse Report.
       
      We wanted to get under the skin of some of these key events and burning issues for 2018. In doing so, we revealed some very interesting results and statistics.
       
      Given a choice of 7 cities, Dublin, Paris and Amsterdam are the top three choices for Asset Managers, Fintech and Financial Services employees to relocate to following Brexit. While 54% would not consider moving as a result of Brexit.
       
      When it comes to regulation; we are not surprised to find MiFID II and GDPR will affect over 60% of the roles in the industry.
      Positively, 59% believe Gender Pay Gap Reporting will improve the career progression of women.
       
      Please read the report for the full information and do get in touch if you would like to know more about your industry workforce.
       
      Rob Carter, CEO, AlgoMe
    • Eva Keogan
      By Eva Keogan
      My question for the community: Is the narrative, or lack of it, in the media around high profile professional women causing us harm? 
      The reason I"m asking is triggered by the JP Morgan leadership race earlier this month.
       
      While April has seen a lot of Gender Pay Gap reporting, there is another high profile story which has caught my eye but for all the wrong reasons. It is really interesting to see how the US narrative around women differs from the UK. However, the reason I'm putting Forbes, WSJ and Daily Mail together is I'm extremely surprised to find the UK business press did not mention this story at all, which was a major oversight in itself.
       
      So here is the example I am using to illustrate this - the JP Morgan story about its next CEO and how the two front runners are referred to: Forbes and WSJ are supportive while the Daily Mail is focusing on 'single motherhood' - is this necessary to identify a high level executive this way? It comes across as particularly snide and unnecessary but why didn't other publications cover it over here? Let me know your thoughts 
       
      Have a look at these three articles....
      Forbes sees women as leaders, WSJ as successors and the Daily Mail as single mother of three.
       
      1. Two women executives leading
       
      The Two Women Executives Leading JPMorgan Chase Into The Future
      WWW.FORBES.COM Marianne Lake and Jennifer Piepszak, the two women executives leading JPMorgan Chase into the future in two new two leadership roles and as potential successors to CEO James Dimon.  
       
      2. Wall Street Journal - women with decades of experience
       
      Two Female Executives Top Short List for Next JPMorgan Chief
      WWW.WSJ.COM JPMorgan Chase put two women with decades of experience at the bank at the top of the list to one day succeed James Dimon as chief executive.  
      3. Daily Mail - a single mother of three
       
      'First woman of Wall St' could be new boss of JPMorgan | Daily Mail Online
      WWW.DAILYMAIL.CO.UK British-born Marianne Lake, 48, a single mother of three dubbed the 'first woman of Wall Street' has been tipped as a contender to succeed CEO James Dimon at JPMorgan Chase.  
       
    • Luuk Jacobs
      By Luuk Jacobs
      We partnered with Imperial College Business School for a panel discussion about the Impacts of FinTech to careers in Investment Management. We were keen to marry up the collective experience of the panel, and their insights and views, with the audience. Equally we wanted to get a feel for what the next generation of Investment Management professionals should set in their sights.  
        
      Based on the findings from our soon to be published report The Disrupted Career - FinTech, Investment Management and future careers, we created a truly interactive debate as we put the questions we used in our survey to our audience, enabling to give real-time feedback via the AlgoMe Community mobile app. 
        
      The panel consisted of Rob Carter, CEO, AlgoMe and Ruben Lara, Chief Data Officer, Standard Life Aberdeen, and Henrik Grunditz, Co-Founder & Chief Revenue Officer, Hivemind, a FinTech that is helping companies create value from complex data sets. The Moderator was Anne-Louise Burnett, Centre Manager, Imperial College Business School Centre for Global Finance & Technology. 
       

       
       
      The key questions that were discussed were: 
       
      Do I understand typical career paths in Investment Management? 
       
      The combined experience of our panel is both lengthy and varied. For example, moving from working within an investment company, joining a consulting company and also joining other industries where core skills are transferable (eg. within data science), indicated that careers are fluid and certainly not predefined. The key trend however was all the panel members, throughout their careers. kept developing and adding to their skillsets. 
       
      Are career paths less well defined due to the changes happening in the industry? 
       
      There was a general view that indeed career paths are now less well defined than before, and technology and general innovation were changing these paths as existing positions in the industry will likely be displaced by other new ones. The new careers demand an understanding of data and how they can be leveraged to create efficiency, greater understanding of clients, investments and decision making. As the technology impact is just starting to hit the Investment Management industry, career paths will be impacted in the next 10 years to a great extent, beyond what we imagine today. Some research indicates that 90% of today’s jobs will not exist in 10-15 years.  
       
      What skills will be the most important to develop careers in Investment Management? 
       
      As already mentioned, skills linked to data science will be important. Along with this, the ability to interpret what it presents, to further support risk management, controls, understanding of clients and trends in the market as well as supporting (investment) decision making. These skills will be in demand for both junior and senior positions and given the technology developments ahead of us will likely change and become more complex. 
       
      What will, and what can, you do to progress your career? 
       
      The panel indicated that if they were looking at their 20-year younger self, they would not have seen themselves in the positions they are today. Nevertheless, a key ‘red line’ through their careers was the development of their main professional interest and continuously developing the associated skills, be it business management, data and analytics, or information systems engineering. All equally being influenced by the need of these aforementioned hard technology skills. 
       
      Rob Carter stressed the value of having mentors throughout your career, people that can guide you and hold a mirror up for you. Hendrik Grunditz mentioned the benefits of networking, staying in touch with people and create a reputation of being nice, delivering constant high quality and be committed. Ruben Lara added to this the need for the softer skills and ability to influence, manage stakeholders and communication. 
       
      We believe the Investment Management professional career is about to change direction, and for some this will be a radical change. It seems everyone is in agreement and there are very exciting times ahead, especially for those with a passion for technology and change. 
       
Debug info for admin:
appforums
moduleforums
controllertopic
topics/forum ID67
page ID
PHP user agentCCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)
×

We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. If you continue, we’ll assume you are happy with this. For further information, see our Privacy Policy.