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Andy Milner

Is Asset Management Millennial Friendly?

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Luuk Jacobs

Far from being technically a millennial myself, I can align myself with the millennials when it comes to motivation:

- I always wanted to have a responsibility where I did not need someone to look over my shoulder but yes be there when clarification was needed

- Every new challenge had to be for me an opportunity to become better myself and the company

- The purpose has to go beyond making the bottom line look (or be) better

At the start of my career I was also in charge of the IT development on an IBM AS400 and I understand that these are still running in some companies. However a millennial growing up with a constant latest technology at hand companies that are technology laggards will not appeal to them as they will have a feeling of walking into history instead of the future; being in charge of your career does not match with working for a dinosaur ....

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