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Stuart Bull

Current HR professionals, here is your chance to do some bench marking against the industry.

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Luuk Jacobs

@stuartBull Although I can not directly represent as a company, I am very interested in seeing the outcome of the survey.

 

From my engagement with clients in asset management I have seen the SMCR project being lewd by either Compliance or HR. This might have its pro's but also its cons as ultimately this is about the organisation and its people taken the responsibility for understanding their responsibilities and making sure that the governance in the company can give them the assurance that they carry out this responsibility within the company and regulatory parameters; SMCR understanding is and should not be limited to HR and Compliance departments

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