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Andy Milner

Diversity fatigue

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Pierre-Yves Rahari

It would be interesting to dig into this topic of fatigue, which generally applies to items that you consider over-discussed, and have outlived their shelf-life. Is it really the case of the diversity issue in Financial Services. The statistics don't lie, we are still far from an equitable situation, no matter how you look at the numbers. But maybe some are tired to endlessly beating the drum, and see only slow and painful progress, whereas others may be tired of ... well ... hearing the drum. I don't think, though, that it is such a black and white situation (no pun intended), rather, this fatigue may just be a signal that we need to reframe the dialogue and discussions around diversity, and listen to the voices around us more carefully ... how to do that may be the secret to restoring the enthusiasm for the topic, which, I am afraid, be cannot do the economy of ... Any ideas anyone, on how to refrain this dialogue?

 

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      WWW.LINKEDIN.COM Sign in or join now to see posts like this one and more.
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