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Luuk Jacobs

Are ETFs and Index funds a threat to capitalism

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Luuk Jacobs

A very interesting article re. the risk that is associated with the current popularity of ETF ie the consequences for valuations and liquidity in the market; at some stage especially with regards to index funds there is simply not enough capacity to invest in the companies part of an index which will could lead to liquidity issues and artificial driving up the price of the shares of the underlying assets. 

 

I know there are other views among professionals in the investment management and wealth industry but I would like to hear your views

 

FAS-RdPlanta-ETF-interview-20180701-EN.pdf

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