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  • Chris Freeman
    Chris Freeman

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    My recommended resources for your career success

      Time to read: 4min

    Your career goal will be guiding your decisions and approach to get there, but it won’t really tell you how to go about achieving the success you are looking for. I’m often asked for recommendations on what books to read or business titles to subscribe to so here is an eclectic selection of reading matter to add to your list. Please do feel free to add any further titles you’ve found useful in the comments section too. Over the course of your career no doubt you will need to master public speaking and receive mentoring or become a mentor so there are some tips here for these as well.

     

    Books to read

    There are lots of management/self-help books, ‘Passing time in the Loo’ (yes really is a book) sums up a number of them), they don't give a quick fix, but reading a steady stream, enables you to look at things in a different light, builds up your arsenal to cope with what life throws at you and more importantly gives strategies to build your capability.

     

    If you only ready one of these read “Who moved my cheese” (watch the video, read the book and find the meaning). It pretty much sums up life's (professional) struggles and the 2 different ways that people and rats approach them.

     

    Other books I would recommend are:

     

    The Robert Greene Collection, if nothing else there are some great stories in both these books

     

      

    The main point is that as you read through these you will start to see where some of these strategies have been played out at work or in life in general. Also, the last section in each chapter gives an example of how the strategy failed and why.

     

    Paul Arden is a famous advertising executive, both his books

     

    Are easy reads, page per subject but really gets you thinking about the art of the possible.

     

    Malcom Gladwell, any of his books (Outliers) are a must. The main point is that they show how effort pays off in pursuit of success.

     

    Harvard Business Review (HBR), well worth subscribing to. Gives a good insight into business strategy and very topical. Good reference resource for projects and developments, but also to drop into conversations.

     

    HBR also do a good line in management books.

     

    There are obviously lots of other books out there, so try some others as well.

     

    Public Speaking

    The power and impact of being able to get up and speak in front of an audience should not be underestimated. There are lots of courses you can go on, but all are costly. I would recommend Toastmasters, as not overly expensive and it has clubs all over the world that you can drop into as a guest. I recommend starting out with a local group as then you get experience of talking about subjects other than work. They will teach you about ‘ums’ and ‘errs’, holding an audience and speaking without thinking. Also volunteer if there is ever an opportunity to do any form of public speaking, the more you do the better you will get.

     

    Mentoring

    The AlgoMe Community provides you with the opportunity to find a mentor to support you in the decision making in your career. A mentor can be for you the great resource for knowledge of the Investment Management industry but equally someone that through sharing of experience can give the guidance for the goals you need to set, the thing you will need to consider giving up, how you set your boundaries and deal with how others think. 

     

    If your mentor is someone from inside your company, (s)he could be a great support in making career progress happen and guide you through the internal potential pitfalls. 

     

    Lastly: Love, Life and happiness

    Love is what will drive you and support you and is more important than success or money. You only get one life, so make the most of it. That doesn’t mean to take the easy option, grab every opportunity/challenge that life throws at you. Enjoy the ride. You will succeed because of, rather than in spite of, what life throws at you.

     

    Happiness is a state of mind, not a goal.

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    Luuk Jacobs

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    Who moved my cheese has, since I know the book/story, always been a reminder to me to observe what is happening around me and indeed if my pile of cheese is reducing and if I need to go on the search for new and/or other cheese. It is a book that can be applied in many many an environment

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