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  • Chris Freeman
    Chris Freeman

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    A guide to planning decisions to help you achieve success

      Time to read: 3min

     

    A guide to planning decisions to help you achieve success

    We are still relatively early on in the New Year so change and improvement is likely to be on your agenda. While fitness and diet are probably the first to pick up on our radars, work and careers are not far behind and many of us will be taking stock and giving our life at work a bit of an overhaul too. 

     

    Being successful is part and parcel of ambition. However, there is no magic pill that will make you successful in your career. Only you can make yourself successful and whatever it means to you is the key. You are the one that sets the bar and puts in the effort and reaps the rewards.

     

    As you will be making throughout your career the decisions to create your road to success, what should you be looking at? Here are six questions to pose to yourself which may require some soul searching but are incredibly useful tools too. 

     

    1 First and foremost, what does success mean to you?

    You can’t be successful if you haven’t got a goal, so how would you describe this for yourself?

    • Is it money, position, power, quality of life, work life balance, family, health, friendships, social life or something else or more likely a combination of these?
    • If a combination of all the above, in what sort of ratio do each of these and others fit in?
    • Define the measure of your level of success
      • What level/seniority do you want to reach?
      • Do you want to be top of the bottom (big fish, little pond), bottom of the top (small fish, big pond), or reach for the stars (big fish, big pond)?

     

    2 Are you willing to give up/or to let go or do you want the cake and eat it all?

    The most likely truth of the matter is you can’t have it all, but I’m happy to be proved wrong on this one.

    If you want to go after a goal you have to be single minded about achieving it. This doesn’t mean you give up everything else, but you may need to move on from old/stale habits and beliefs. You need to give yourself a personal audit looking at;

    • What’s stale?
    • What’s are you willing to give up (even for a short period), this may even be something you enjoy doing, but can no longer justify the time/cost?

     

    3 Where are your boundaries?

    This is possibly the most important area of all. As you progress you will unconsciously change, but proceed with caution here. You will want to be an improved version of your current self, not turn into someone you don’t want to be! You will therefore need to set some parameters about your values and ethics. 

    • What are the red lines you will never cross?
    • What are your ethics?
    • How will you treat others?
    • How do you payback your good fortune?

     

    4 What others think

    Some people will celebrate your success others will think you are a show off, getting too big for your boots/selling out.

    • What will you do to take people with you on the journey?
    • Who don’t you mind losing along the way?

     

    5 Building support

    You will need a support network both at home and at work.

    • Who will these people be?
    • Do you share your goals with them?
    • What is their payback for being on the team?
    • How will you support them?

     

    6 Failure

    You might not be successful immediately and don’t let yourself be put off by failing, learn from it and try again. If you don’t fail, you might not have tried hard enough.

     

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    Pierre-Yves Rahari

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    Great article, Chris. I fully agree on your suggested first step. I frequently use a vision or mood board to do this: Very visual (as the name suggests), and very powerful tool. Much recommended ...

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