Jump to content
  • Luuk Jacobs
    Luuk Jacobs

    Sign in to follow this  

    Gender Pay Gap Reporting: It gets worse before it gets better

    The discussion around the Gender Pay Gap has moved from the shock of the published figures to ‘What can or needs to be done to reduce the gap?’.  A quick fix is extremely unlikely. Ultimately, the Gender Pay Gap is all about creating the opportunities for women to (continue to) move up in the ranks. And yes, promotion of women might have been overdue but doing this in itself is the first sign a company is serious about resolving the issue, but it does not stop there.

     

    When Dame Helena Morrissey spoke at the Alfi conference recently, she made two points very clear. First to get long term and lasting results it is likely to get worse before it gets better; and second, it takes time to change company culture and bias as well as professional development through education and gaining experience.

     

    So, what can companies do for women to ensure ongoing career development? Here are five ways which we believe will make a difference

     

    Change policy

    Many argue working to change attitudes towards promoting women to more senior roles should be the first thing to tackle, but there is evidence that changing policy on diversity, employment, recruitment has a much bigger.  Iris Bohnet, a behavioural economist at Harvard University says ‘diversity training programs have had limited success, and individual effort alone often invites backlash. Behavioural design offers a new solution. By de-biasing organizations instead of individuals, we can make smart changes that have big impacts’.

     

    Analyse the data

    Analysing the Gender Pay Gap data in detail could highlight business areas and departments where the issue is bigger, and possibly even show departments with a bias for not promoting women in more senior jobs. This enables a company to address these areas or even individuals immediately and supported by the aforementioned policy changes.

     

    Mentoring programs

    Over the past two decades, laboratory and survey evidence has suggested that men are significantly more likely to engage in salary negotiations than women, according to Harvard. Yet when women negotiate on behalf of another person they are as successful as men.Mentoring could help strengthen these negotiating skills but clearly the focus should not be only on remuneration but equally on improving the specific knowledge and skills, as well as understanding your industry and company.

     

    Flexible working

    Career breaks come in many different forms, although for women the main one is maternity leave. If this is longer than a year, when they to work they may face the “CV gap” which leaves them at a disadvantage. There is some work being done on Returnships, but more businesses should take this into account rationally and offer different approaches to working to ensure women should be able to return to jobs that match their skills. To retain talent, hey should also offer flexible working hours and the opportunity to work from home which makes returning to work more appealing.

     

    Recruitment process

    Companies should ensure that employment practices are fair and there is no bias in recruitment across teams nor in the way job descriptions are worded. Equally there should not be any positive discrimination and trying to recruit women into teams simply because of their gender, and vice-versa. In line with offering more flexible working, fairness in pay for maternity, paternity and shared parental leave must be considered, as well as pay for part time staff.

     

    What next?

    Clearly this is not an exhaustive list of how to close the Gender Pay Gap and the ultimately chosen direction of a company will very much depend on their specific situation. Nevertheless, the above suggestions are fairly easy to implement and will show to employees that the company is serious about making a change.

     

    It is never going to be a quick fix and might take at least 3-5 years before there is a significant change visible in the reported pay gaps, but change is afoot.

     

    In the short term, due to the lead time of implementing change, the gap might even initially widen before closing.



    Sign in to follow this  

    Share this  

    Member Feedback



    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.

    Become a member to read more and join the discussion

    Members can read and contribute to discussions

    Apply

    Register now for free access.

    Create your account

    Sign in

    Already a member? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • FSTP LLP in partnership with AlgoMe invite you to a lunchtime round table discussion on the most pressing issues in today’s industry; digital skills shortage and the apprenticeship levy
       
      Introducing your hosts:
      FSTP LLP, a Main Provider for Apprenticeships offering Financial Services, Leadership and Management Apprenticeships, will be on hand to share insights and experience AlgoMe, the community for the Investment Management industry, connecting professionals from Asset Managers, Wealth Managers and FinTechs with their wider industry ecosystem will be on hand to discuss skills and transformation in the industry  
      The event:
      12.30 - 12.50
      Your co-hosts Rob Carter and Andy Milner, AlgoMe will give an overview of demand for retraining and tech skills, based on the latest AlgoMe report; The Disrupted Career: FinTech, Innovation and The Future Of Careers In Investment Management Followed by Philippa Grocott and Nicola Spennati from FSTP LLP, will give an overview of opportunities for using the apprenticeship levy and how to do so effectively within the industry sector 12.50 – 14.00 Group discussion over lunch
       
      Attendance is limited and on a first come first serve basis. Please contact andy.milner@algome.com if you would like to attend.
        • Like
      • 0 replies
    • The Disrupted Career
       
      Welcome To The AlgoMe Report On FinTech, Innovation And The Future Of Careers In Investment Management
       
      This report aims to address key questions that are important to everyone working in or looking to join the Investment Management Industry.
       
      How significant will the impact of FinTech be on career paths? How likely is my current role to be affected? Where are the opportunities in this disruption? How can I best position myself for future success?  
      We asked a panel of Investment Industry professionals their views.
       
      The full report is available for download to all AlgoMe Community members. Not already joined? Becoming a member takes less than a minute.
        • Like
      • 0 replies
    • With the decorations up, the last order date for Amazon nigh and most of us looking forward to at least a few days break, it’s always a good time to take stock of what’s been achieved over the last 12 months.
       
      For AlgoMe this has been another exciting year.
       
      January started in style with the launch of the AlgoMe Careers mobile app – giving professionals the opportunity to find their next career opportunity on the move.
       
      Then in July we released our Industry Pulse Report – a check on what the industry was thinking about key topics such as Brexit, Pay Gap Reporting, MiFiD II and GDPR. Unfortunately it seems that the uncertainty that the industry was feeling due to Brexit is unlikely to have receded in the intervening period, but it’s good to see progress starting to be made in other areas such as gender and diversity.
       
      In September we launched AlgoMe Community – a place for the Investment / Asset Management industry to come together, providing professionals with ways to grow their knowledge, profile and network. We’d like to say a big thank you to all of the members that have joined and contributed and look forward to continuing growth in 2019.
       
      In November AlgoMe joined the Investment Association, becoming a Fintech member and working closely with Velocity, the Association’s new Fintech accelerator. This is a really exciting initiative and we’re looking forward to doing more with Velocity in the near future.
       
      We also launched our Mentoring matching service in November – designed to help AlgoMe Community members connect with the best individuals within the community to help them to reach their career goals using a simple but intelligent process. If you haven’t already signed up to be a mentor or a mentee, please do spend 5 minutes now and tick off a New Year’s Resolution early.
       
      As we go into the end of the year, we have also launched our survey on Investment Management, Fintech and the future of careers. The impact of Fintech on the industry is going to accelerate rapidly in 2019, but what has been less well documented is the impact on individuals, their careers and the skills they’ll need to succeed in a more digitised environment. We really value the input of our community members, so please spend a couple of minutes filling out the survey and we’ll make sure you’re the first to hear the results early next year.
       
      From me and the AlgoMe team, I wish you all a very happy holiday season and look forward to another year of exciting announcements and change in 2019.
       
      Rob
       
        • Like
      • 0 replies
    • I have always struggled to see a fair reason why employers should be allowed to ask about a potential hire’s current remuneration, other than to give them an advantage in pay negotiations.
      It’s something which can only exacerbate existing pay inequalities and  it’s abolishment can surely only be a positive thing.
      Here the Guardian argues specifically about its impact with regards to the gender pay gap:
      https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/aug/23/gender-pay-gap-current-salary-question
      I believe this has already been outlawed in some US states?
      @Jonathan Max - would be interesting to hear the view from HR. 
      • 10 replies
    • The Investment Association recently gave the industry a boost when it announced the launch of Velocity, its FinTech accelerator.  Designed to identify, develop and accelerate best in class firms with innovative solutions, Velocity will champion and facilitate the wider adoption of technology across the industry.
       
      And AlgoMe will be involved in this too, which is why I’m excited to announce we are now a member organisation of the Investment Association as an official FinTech member and have been named a "company to watch" by Velocity.
       
      Challenging Times
      The Investment Management industry faces major challenges and opportunities from forces such as digital technology, pressure on fees and increased regulation, while at the same time there are widespread changes in the workforce and their expectations.
       
      To date, Investment Management has both been fairly insulated from the challenges posed by agile FinTech competitors, but also distant from the opportunities offered by the new technologies and ways of thinking that such companies bring.
       
      Bringing FinTech closer
      Velocity is a fantastic step towards accelerating the adoption of FinTech. It has received support and endorsements from both inside and outside the industry, including from the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Phillip Hammond, who was enthusiastic about the initiative at a recent City event.
       
      To drive change and innovation, the industry needs to connect across different disciplines and areas of expertise, driving new ways of thinking and fostering cultural change.
       
      Without the benefit of emerging FinTechs and their external expertise, it will be hard for incumbents to harness the benefits of emerging technologies such as Straight Through deal Processing (STP), Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT), and Artificial Intelligence (AI) in areas such as risk and compliance, securities trading and investment decision making.
       
      Our Mission
      AlgoMe's mission is to connect the Investment Management industry and empower professionals to manage their careers. Our new product, AlgoMe Community, is placed to become the hub for the discussion between FinTechs and the companies and professionals in the wider Investment Management ecosystem.
       
      Join AlgoMe Community today
       
      AlgoMe Community - community.algome.com
        • Like
      • 0 replies
  • Related Content

    • Jonathan Max
      By Jonathan Max
      I started at Lehman Brothers in 2005 in their HR team; they had been a client organisation of mine for a few years and was I extremely excited to be joining in the heady days of a raging bull market. While an industry contact had informed me of the potential role; there was the ‘standard’ interview process of seemingly meeting everyone. Did I really know what to expect or how to make the most of the opportunity? Not really is the honest answer.
       
      I learned how to progress my career as I went along; but, in truth was more focused on being accepted and delivering in what was a culturally unique organisation. I stayed at Lehman Brothers until it reached its dénouement in 2008. After the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy, I transferred to Nomura and was again part of a fascinating journey with many twists and turns along the way. The market was clearly in a very different place; the next years were a seemingly endless journey of organisational ‘Re’....Restructuring, Realignment, Repositioning, Reorganisation and so on. I left Nomura in 2017 and now reflect on what I wish someone had told me in 2005 about career development; so I have summarised as follows: 
       
      Find a mentor
      My approach here was somewhat ad-hoc. I had a great relationship with my line manager and then an organisation change resulted in a different reporting line. To placate some pre-existing hostility between my former and new line manager; the safest route was to form a ‘mentoring relationship’ with my previous manager so I could still benefit from his considerable insight and advice. I developed several mentoring relationships; both within and outside the companies. A couple were more formal, the others less so but equally valuable. They were people with different backgrounds and experience who could share information and provide guidance. 
       
      Sun Microsystems undertook a body of research around its own mentoring programme, which came up with some very compelling results Mentors were promoted six times more often than those not in the programme; mentees were promoted five times more often than those not in the programme. Having mentoring in your early career is obviously going to speed up progress, but according to the Harvard Business Review article on mentoring “Everyone we spoke with over age 40 could name a mentor in his or her professional life, but younger people often could not”.  Therefore, to get ahead of the game and progress your career you need to think carefully about how to develop the right mentoring relationships and do this early on. Or, put another way, when you can gain practical advice and learn from the experience of others; why would you not seek mentoring relationships?  
       
      Join Networking Groups
      I founded what was to become the largest employee driven network at Nomura; comprising over 750 people in the UK and beyond and holding several events every month. So why did I do this? Because I thought it would be a bit of fun and with the support of my manager and head of diversity something that would bring a bit of variety to me professionally and personally. 
      With this decision, I completely missed the significant benefit this would have on my career. I was able to find new ways to navigate the organisation and find the find answers I needed. I had ‘friendly’ contacts in many departments; if they couldn’t help me they would point me in the right direction. As my day-to-day work became complex and involved working across several different groups and businesses; I had the right contacts to make things easier. I’m not saying you need to form a group but being part of internal and external networking groups is absolutely essential to successful career development. This article; 10 Important Benefits of Networking is a very accurate overview of why this needs to be part of your game-plan.
       
      Leverage the appraisal process
      I don’t think I was in a group of one in my early approach to appraisals and performance management. Typically, following a number of automated reminders, I would complete the mid-year or year-end process with seconds to spare and that was that until the next reminder arrived in my inbox. Most of the completion time was spend on ‘refreshing’ myself on the objectives I had set and then trying to recall enough information to make a decent attempt at well considered response. My advice here is embrace the appraisal process to your advantage as I started to do after realising how I could benefit from a more structured approach; how you evidence your achievements is just as important as how you determine your goals and where to focus your skills. Contrary to popular myth, a sense of entitlement on how your career should progress doesn’t work! What is truer is that management talk and discuss people; so make sure you are in the group of people that gets discussed for the right reasons and opportunities will come your way. Even if the traditional annual performance appraisal process is giving way to more frequent conversations between a manager and subordinate; make sure you are ready to have discussions about your future.

      Know your Industry
      Earlier on in my career, I was too focused on my immediate environment and in trying to deliver day-to-day. Therefore, my perspectives were too internalised, and I wasn’t able to draw on external sources for new or alternative perspectives. I started to change this; attending industry events; reading and learning to increase my understating of the industry and how different elements knitted together.
      What I didn’t realise immediately, is that managers are having to demonstrate this very thing to their superiors and don’t necessarily have the bandwidth to get into all the detail. Making yourself a ‘go-to person’ for information enhances your personal brand and with that you get to get involved in more interesting projects and assignments and hence career development is a beneficial consequence.

      As Abraham Lincoln said, "The best way to predict the future is to create it.", that’s not something you can leave for someone else to do if you want to progress your career.
    • Luuk Jacobs
      By Luuk Jacobs
      We partnered with Imperial College Business School for a panel discussion about the Impacts of FinTech to careers in Investment Management. We were keen to marry up the collective experience of the panel, and their insights and views, with the audience. Equally we wanted to get a feel for what the next generation of Investment Management professionals should set in their sights.  
        
      Based on the findings from our soon to be published report The Disrupted Career - FinTech, Investment Management and future careers, we created a truly interactive debate as we put the questions we used in our survey to our audience, enabling to give real-time feedback via the AlgoMe Community mobile app. 
        
      The panel consisted of Rob Carter, CEO, AlgoMe and Ruben Lara, Chief Data Officer, Standard Life Aberdeen, and Henrik Grunditz, Co-Founder & Chief Revenue Officer, Hivemind, a FinTech that is helping companies create value from complex data sets. The Moderator was Anne-Louise Burnett, Centre Manager, Imperial College Business School Centre for Global Finance & Technology. 
       

       
       
      The key questions that were discussed were: 
       
      Do I understand typical career paths in Investment Management? 
       
      The combined experience of our panel is both lengthy and varied. For example, moving from working within an investment company, joining a consulting company and also joining other industries where core skills are transferable (eg. within data science), indicated that careers are fluid and certainly not predefined. The key trend however was all the panel members, throughout their careers. kept developing and adding to their skillsets. 
       
      Are career paths less well defined due to the changes happening in the industry? 
       
      There was a general view that indeed career paths are now less well defined than before, and technology and general innovation were changing these paths as existing positions in the industry will likely be displaced by other new ones. The new careers demand an understanding of data and how they can be leveraged to create efficiency, greater understanding of clients, investments and decision making. As the technology impact is just starting to hit the Investment Management industry, career paths will be impacted in the next 10 years to a great extent, beyond what we imagine today. Some research indicates that 90% of today’s jobs will not exist in 10-15 years.  
       
      What skills will be the most important to develop careers in Investment Management? 
       
      As already mentioned, skills linked to data science will be important. Along with this, the ability to interpret what it presents, to further support risk management, controls, understanding of clients and trends in the market as well as supporting (investment) decision making. These skills will be in demand for both junior and senior positions and given the technology developments ahead of us will likely change and become more complex. 
       
      What will, and what can, you do to progress your career? 
       
      The panel indicated that if they were looking at their 20-year younger self, they would not have seen themselves in the positions they are today. Nevertheless, a key ‘red line’ through their careers was the development of their main professional interest and continuously developing the associated skills, be it business management, data and analytics, or information systems engineering. All equally being influenced by the need of these aforementioned hard technology skills. 
       
      Rob Carter stressed the value of having mentors throughout your career, people that can guide you and hold a mirror up for you. Hendrik Grunditz mentioned the benefits of networking, staying in touch with people and create a reputation of being nice, delivering constant high quality and be committed. Ruben Lara added to this the need for the softer skills and ability to influence, manage stakeholders and communication. 
       
      We believe the Investment Management professional career is about to change direction, and for some this will be a radical change. It seems everyone is in agreement and there are very exciting times ahead, especially for those with a passion for technology and change. 
       
    • Eva Keogan
      By Eva Keogan
      Direct quote from Investment Week: The number of firms in the UK reporting their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) figures by the deadline has fallen by more than a thousand, amid claims firms have restructured businesses or transferred staff to avoid being obliged to report, or have ditched reporting altogether under the perception they will not face repercussions.
       
      Is anyone working for a company which has done this? Is it time to name and shame as has been threatened before? Your thoughts are welcome.
       
      This is quite worrying to read and it's not just Investment Week which has reported on this but to down size companies so they are below the 250-person threshold for reporting is incredibly cynical. Has anyone found evidence of this? Also, using Brexit as a smokescreen is not going to wash next year.
       
       
      Gender pay gap reporting falls as asset managers unveil mixed results
      WWW.INVESTMENTWEEK.CO.UK More than 1,000 fewer firms reveal figures  
    • Luuk Jacobs
      By Luuk Jacobs
      The Investment Association just published their report "CLOSING THE GAP: ADDRESSING THE GENDER PAY GAP" which in part 3 looks at the "Industry Initiatives for Change". A very welcome publication that gives a good summary of what our industry (although I would think any industry) can do to close the gap, concentrated around:
      Attraction and recruitment; Retention and advancement; and Monitoring  
      When reading it, I still come away with the feeling that it does not go beyond the standard and is not necessarily addressing cultural issues as indicated in my earlier blog or is moving away from the beaten path.    
      20190327-genderpaygapreport.pdf
    • Rob Carter
      By Rob Carter
      Brexit, MiFID II, GDPR, Gender Pay Gap and Diversity are the themes we consider top of mind currently which is why we’ve created the Summer 2018 AlgoMe Industry Pulse Report.
       
      We wanted to get under the skin of some of these key events and burning issues for 2018. In doing so, we revealed some very interesting results and statistics.
       
      Given a choice of 7 cities, Dublin, Paris and Amsterdam are the top three choices for Asset Managers, Fintech and Financial Services employees to relocate to following Brexit. While 54% would not consider moving as a result of Brexit.
       
      When it comes to regulation; we are not surprised to find MiFID II and GDPR will affect over 60% of the roles in the industry.
      Positively, 59% believe Gender Pay Gap Reporting will improve the career progression of women.
       
      Please read the report for the full information and do get in touch if you would like to know more about your industry workforce.
       
      Rob Carter, CEO, AlgoMe
Debug info for admin:
appcms
modulepages
controllerpage
topics/forum ID48
page ID
PHP user agentCCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)
×

We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. If you continue, we’ll assume you are happy with this. For further information, see our Privacy Policy.